My Minnesota Work Comp Claim Was Denied Because of a Prior Injury. Now What?

This is another of the common problems we often deal with when helping people who have been injured on the job across northern Minnesota.

Typical situation:  you have been working for several years without any physical problems, work restrictions, lost time or any other difficulties or limitations. Then one day at work, you are lifting or carrying something and suffer an injury to your back (or neck, shoulder, knee, elbow, etc.). You report the injury to your employer, explaining exactly what happened and you make an appointment to see your doctor or chiropractor.

Maybe you fill out some more paperwork for your employer or maybe you receive a call from a claims adjuster from the work comp insurance company, asking for more details about the injury and your medical history. Perhaps you are off work on doctor’s orders and receiving therapy or other treatment while you try to heal and get back to work.

One day in the mail you receive a notice from the work comp insurance company explaining that your work comp claim has been denied. DENIED?!?! Apparently, you had received medical treatment for a back injury 15 years ago and the insurance company has decided that your current problems are a pre-existing condition. Claim denied!

Claim Denied. Options?

At this point, you may have already lost several weeks of wages and run up hundreds, or thousands, of dollars in medical bills.  You had reasonably assumed that everything would be taken care of by work comp because your injury had occurred on the job. Now what do you do? Well, you basically have two options:

Option #1:  Walk away. If you have health insurance or are willing to go back to work and “tough it out”, you can simply let the matter drop and walk away from the claim. Your employer and the work comp insurance company would be very happy if you make that choice. In fact, insurance companies count on the fact that many people will simply walk away after a claim is denied, instead of even contacting an attorney for legal advice or a consultation. The downside of this option is that your claim will never be recorded as a work injury and you will have no protection if it turns out to be a long-term or serious problem. In addition, all claims have deadlines, also called statutes of limitation, which require you to formally file a work comp claim with the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry, Workers’ Compensation Division, within a certain time frame. If you fail to legally file your claim before the deadline expires your claim will be barred forever. An experienced attorney can tell you when the deadline might be for your particular claim.

Option #2:  Fight the insurance company for the benefits to which you are entitled under Minnesota’s workers’ compensation laws. Your first step would be to contact an experienced work comp attorney for a consultation to see if you have a claim worth pursuing. After that, the attorney will pursue the claim by gathering medical records and reports, filing whatever claims you might have and fighting with the insurance company on your behalf until the claim is resolved.

Can My Claim Be Denied Because I Had a Prior Injury To the Same Body Part?

There are any number of reasons that the insurance company may use to deny a claim and this is one of them. Unfortunately, many people believe that a pre-existing condition or prior injury disqualifies them from a work comp claim if they later injure the same body part. Again, this is the type of misinformation the insurance company relies on when they deny claims and hope that the person simply walks away.

 

Aggravation of a Pre-existing Condition

The law in Minnesota does not disqualify you from work comp benefits if you have a prior injury or medical condition which has been reinjured at work. A pre-existing condition which has been substantially aggravated or accelerated by a work injury or even regular work activities, is still covered by workers’ compensation. It doesn’t matter if it is an injury to your back, neck, head, shoulder, knee or any other part of your body. It doesn’t matter if you need surgery or have previously had surgery. The issue is simply whether your work injury or activities have substantially contributed to your present condition. This is good news for people injured on the job but it usually still requires that you find an attorney to help you fight with the insurance company.

The burden of proof in a Minnesota work comp claim is on the employee. This means that, where a claim is denied or disputed, the employee must prove that the injury is covered under the work comp law. This is generally accomplished by filing a claim, obtaining a medical report which supports the connection between the work activities and the injury and then either taking the case to a hearing or reaching a settlement.

Conclusion

If this describes your situation or the situation of someone you know, then the initial step would be to consult with an attorney. Equally important is having a doctor who is willing to assist and support your claim in the dispute with an insurance company. Not every doctor is willing to take the time to review medical records and prepare a medical report at the request of your lawyer. That’s why it’s also very important to carefully select your treating physician in a work comp claim. For more information on this topic please see our previous post- Choosing a Doctor for Your Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Claim.

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about your claim or the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us, anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you. If you have questions about how much it costs to hire a lawyer for a Minnesota workers’ compensation case, you can check out this previous post.

Remember, you are dealing with an insurance company which handles hundreds or thousands of claims every day. They have experienced claims adjusters and attorneys managing their files. Even if you don’t need a lawyer at the moment, a little information about the work comp system can make a big difference for you in your dealings with the insurance company. At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 33 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information and assistance for workers injured in northern Minnesota and anywhere on the Iron Range.

Can the Insurance Company Refuse to Pay Medical Bills after a Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Settlement?

This is a question I frequently hear not only from clients but also from people who have settled a claim, with or without a lawyer, at sometime in the past. In fact, sometimes many years have gone by since the settlement before this issue arises and I receive a phone call. The question is usually something along these lines:

“I settled my work comp case but medical was left open, now the insurance company won’t pay for a doctor visit (or an MRI, surgery, etc. ) – how can they do this?”

This can be a very confusing issue after the settlement of a work comp claim, whether or not you were represented by an attorney. It would seem, from a common sense standpoint, that if future medical coverage was supposedly “left open” for your work injury, then the insurance company should have to pay any future medical bills. However, it’s not quite that simple, for several reasons:

1. The work comp insurance company always has the right to challenge whether medical treatment is reasonable, necessary and related to the work injury.  Regardless of whether an injury claim is accepted, decided in your favor by a judge or settled, the insurance company is not obligated to pay every medical bill without question. The burden of proof remains on the injured employee in a Minnesota work comp case, which means that you have to prove that any disputed medical treatment is reasonable, necessary, and related to the work injury.

This typically requires some medical support for your claim, either in the form of medical records which clearly explain the situation or in the form of a medical report from a treating physician which addresses the disputed issues and supports your position. For this reason, it is very important to have a doctor who not only understands the work comp system but is also willing to support you, if necessary, with a letter or medical report. (For more information about selecting a doctor in a work comp case, see our previous blog post here).

2. Months or even years have passed without treatment for your injuries. If you haven’t treated for your work injury in a long time, the insurance company will not have any up-to-date information regarding your claim and they will want to make sure that the medical care is still related to the work injury. Sometimes, all the insurance company needs is updated medical records which will demonstrate that your physicians are still relating your treatment to the original work injury. If the medical records do not clearly make that connection, it may be necessary to get a letter or report from your doctor. In any event, the insurance company is entitled to get updated information before deciding whether to pay a medical bill or authorize treatment.

3. You have been back to work for a different employer since the settlement. The insurance company will likely want to make sure that you haven’t had a new injury or that your new job has not aggravated the injury that was covered by your previous settlement. Again, particularly in a case where you haven’t made any medical claims for some period of time, the insurance company will need updated information before making a decision on any medical bills. In fact, if you have returned to work in a different job and your symptoms have increased or worsened, you may very well have a new work comp claim against your new employer for a permanent or substantial aggravation of your underlying medical condition.

4. Your current problems were not specifically addressed in the settlement agreement.  Let’s assume that the original injury and settlement involved your left shoulder and you are now having problems with your left elbow. Your doctor suspects that the elbow problems may be coming from the shoulder or are somehow related to the shoulder injury. The language in the settlement papers describing what injuries were covered will be very important. In this type of case, it may come down to arguing about whether the elbow problems are related to the shoulder or whether they represent a new, unrelated problem. These types of issues arise frequently and are normally going to be the subject of litigation.

5. The medical treatment being denied was closed out under the terms of the settlement.  The settlement papers you signed (a Stipulation for Settlement) described the injuries and claims you were making, the claims or defenses of the insurance company and the terms of the settlement. In many cases, even where future medical remains open, there is an agreement to close out certain, limited future medical treatment such as acupuncture/acupressure, massage therapy, health club memberships, psychiatric/psychological treatment, etc. This means that the insurance company is no longer responsible for any of those types of treatment even if they are related to your original injury.

Also, medical treatment for specific body parts may have been closed out by the terms of the settlement if there were disputes over the nature and extent of your original injuries. For example, you may have originally claimed an injury to your neck and low back but the terms of the settlement may have only left open future medical treatment for your neck, closing out any low back medical claims.

What you can do to help avoid disputes over  future medical coverage after a settlement:

-Understand exactly what body parts and what type of medical coverage remains open and what was closed out by the terms of the settlement;

-Keep a copy of your settlement papers for reference;

-Make sure any and all medical treatment for your injuries after a settlement is billed to the work comp insurer, not to your health insurance. This helps ensure that the work comp insurance company remains aware of your ongoing medical issues if something serious for expensive arises such as surgery or the need for an MRI;

-Make sure to always tell your physician that the condition you are treating for is related to a work injury and give as many details as you can, such as the date of the injury and what body parts were injured, so there is a paper trail of any ongoing medical care or treatment from your work injury.

These are just some of the potential medical scenarios which might arise after a settlement and some of the things you can do to lessen the likelihood of more litigation on your claim. It probably goes without saying that you should not settle a work comp claim without first speaking with an experienced work comp attorney.

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us, anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you.

Remember, you are dealing with an insurance company which handles hundreds or thousands of claims every day. They have experienced claims adjusters and attorneys managing their files. Even if you don’t need a lawyer at the moment, a little information about the work comp system can make a big difference for you in your dealings with the insurance company. At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 33 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information and assistance for workers injured in northern Minnesota and anywhere on the Iron Range

Bradt Law Offices Case Report: Ankle Injury on a Flat, Dry Floor

Type of Case: Workers’ Compensation

Legal Issue or Dispute: Denial of ankle injury claim which occurred at work

Facts: Our client was employed with one of the mining companies in northern Minnesota. His job duties required him to maintain and repair equipment within the facility. On the day he was injured, one of the machines in the plant malfunctioned and began to spew waste material into the air and onto the plant floor. Our client received a radio call to get to the machine, evaluate the problem and assist in any maintenance or repairs which might be necessary.

As he was hurrying across the concrete plant floor and approaching the malfunctioning machine, he rolled his ankle and suffered a severe ankle sprain. The floor was not wet and he did not recall stepping on, or tripping over, any hoses or other debris. He wasn’t even sure what happened except that he was hurrying because of the emergency and was looking up at the malfunctioning machine rather than at the floor.

The claim was completely denied by the employer and its workers’ compensation insurer on the grounds that the injury was not related to the employee’s work activities because he was simply walking across the plant floor at the time of the injury and there was no unsafe or dangerous condition in the plant or on the premises which caused the injury.

The case proceeded to trial before a workers’ compensation judge where we argued that the employee’s work environment caused or contributed to the injury because he was hurrying to deal with an emergency situation and not paying attention to the floor. His job duties required him to deal with the malfunctioning machine as quickly as possible and those factors are what caused or contributed to the injury.

Result: The compensation judge ruled in favor of our client and determined that his ankle injury was covered by workers’ compensation. The case was appealed by the employer/insurer and the Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Court of Appeals affirmed the judge’s decision and awarded benefits to our client.

The insurance company was also required to pay our attorney fees and costs.

If you have questions about any aspect of your northern Minnesota work comp claim, please feel free to contact me at Bradt Law Offices at any time. I am happy to speak with you about your claim or make an appointment for an absolutely free consultation in our Grand Rapids office or wherever it would be convenient for you. We have been representing your friends and neighbors on their work comp claims all across northeastern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 30 years. If you’ve been injured, we can help.

Thank you for visiting our blog.

What Should I Do If I Receive a Notice of Intention to Discontinue Benefits on My Minnesota Work Comp Claim?

At some point in almost any work comp claim where you are paid wage loss benefits, you will receive a Notice of Intention to Discontinue benefits, commonly referred to as an NOID. An NOID is simply a form which the insurer is required to serve and file whenever they will be discontinuing wage loss benefits. The form provides you with notice that your benefits will be ending at a certain time and explains the reason why.

Some reasons why you might receive an NOID form

1. You have returned to work. If you have been off work and receiving wage loss benefits from work comp, you have been receiving Temporary Total Disability (TTD) benefits. These benefits are paid at the rate of 2/3 of your average weekly wage on the date of injury. (For more information on TTD benefits, see our blog post here)

The notice tells you that the insurance company will be discontinuing those benefits because you are back to work and no longer entitled to TTD benefits. If you are returning to work, with restrictions from your injury but earning less than your preinjury wage, you may be entitled to partial wage loss benefits (TPD) and the NOID form should reflect that you will be paid TPD benefits upon returning to work. It doesn’t matter whether you are going back to work for the same employer or whether you have found a new job since the injury.

2. You have exhausted your TTD benefits. For dates of injury between 10/1/95 and 9/30/08, you are limited to 104 weeks of TTD benefits. This means that even if you are still out of work because of the injury, you cannot receive more than 104 weeks of TTD and your benefits will end. For injuries on or after 10/1/08, the maximum number of TTD benefits was increased from 104 to 130 weeks.

3. Your weekly earnings have reached or exceeded your preinjury wage. If you have been working at a wage loss and receiving TPD benefits, those benefits will end once you get back to your preinjury wage, because you no longer have a wage loss.

4. You have reached Maximum Medical Improvement (MMI). If you are receiving TTD benefits, those benefits will end 90 days after you are provided with notice that you have reached MMI. An MMI opinion can come from one of your treating physicians or from a doctor who has examined you for the insurance company (this is called an Independent Medical Exam (IME), more information about an IME can be found here). The explanation for why your benefits are being discontinued must be included on the NOID form.

5. You no longer have work restrictions. If your treating physician, or the IME doctor, gives an opinion that you have no work restrictions as a result of the work injury, you are no longer eligible for wage loss benefits. Most often, this occurs following an IME where the insurance company doctor writes a report and gives the opinion that you have fully recovered from the work injury or that any restrictions you have are not related to the work injury. Sometimes, your own doctor may lift all restrictions without fully understanding how this might affect your claim. (For more information about choosing a physician for a work comp claim, click here).

What you can do if you receive an NOID

Your options after receiving an NOID are explained on the form and will depend upon the reasons for the discontinuance. If you disagree with the discontinuance of benefits or the reasons given, you can request a telephone conference with a work comp judge to argue your position. The time frame to dispute a discontinuance if you want an immediate conference is generally 12 days. The NOID form provides you with a phone number and address and explains how to request the conference.

If you have an attorney, you should obviously make sure that he or she has received a copy of the NOID form and will be requesting a conference on your behalf if you disagree with the discontinuance of your benefits. If you don’t have an attorney, this would be a very good time to contact one. At the discontinuance conference, the insurance company will be represented by either a claims adjuster or an attorney. The discontinuance of your benefits is a serious matter and you should have an experienced work comp attorney representing you at that conference.

If you win at the conference and the judge agrees that your benefits should not be discontinued, the insurance company may appeal but they will have to continue paying your benefits until a formal hearing is scheduled. However, if you lose at the conference, you may appeal but you will not receive any benefits while you wait for the formal hearing and a decision. Having an attorney represent you at the initial conference will generally give you a much better chance to win.

There are some other reasons why your benefits might be discontinued, but these are the most common situations that we typically see.

Contact Us If You Have Questions about Your Claim

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you. If you have questions or concerns about the cost of hiring an attorney, you can check out this previous post- How much does it cost to hire a workers’ compensation lawyer in Minnesota?

At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 32 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information for workers injured in northern Minnesota or anywhere on the Iron Range.

What Is the Difference Between a Settlement Conference and Mediation in a Minnesota Work Comp Case?

Over the past several years we have seen the increasing use of mediation to settle work comp cases in Minnesota. If you have a work comp claim, you may wonder why a settlement conference was scheduled on your case but a mediation has then been proposed or scheduled. What’s the difference, and is one better than the other?

Settlement Conferences

Settlement conferences are automatically scheduled by the workers’ compensation Office of Administrative Hearings after a claim is filed.

In every work comp case where a Claim Petition is filed, a settlement conference is automatically scheduled for approximately 6 months later. Depending upon where you live, these conferences may be scheduled by telephone or may take place in person with a work comp settlement judge in St. Paul. A settlement conferences is an informal opportunity for the parties to attempt to settle any disputed issues and sometimes the entire claim.

Settlement conferences are scheduled to last one hour and a work comp judge presides over the conference to help the parties reach a settlement. It is not a trial and the judge does not have any authority to order the parties to agree to any particular terms, nor does the judge have authority to make any decisions about the disputed issues. If the claim does not settle, it will be put on the trial calendar for a hearing a few months later with a different judge.

Frequently, settlement conferences are either postponed or canceled altogether. A conference may be postponed because it is too early in the case to discuss settlement, possibly because of pending surgeries or ongoing medical care which needs to be completed. In other cases, the parties may agree that there is no possibility of settlement and ask that the case be put on the trial calendar for hearing. This may occur in cases where the insurance company has denied liability for the claim or where there is a dispute over a proposed surgery or medical procedure. In these types of cases, there may be no room for compromise and the disputed issues need to be decided by a judge.

If a case is settled at a conference, the defense attorney will prepare a Stipulation for Settlement, which sets forth the terms of the agreement. All necessary parties must sign the Stipulation and it is then submitted to a compensation judge for approval before the insurance company makes payment.

Mediation

A mediation is also a method to get the case settled but it is more formal and involved than a simple one hour settlement conference. Typically, the parties agree to mediate cases that are more complicated or have more value. The parties will choose a mutually agreeable mediator who is experienced in Minnesota workers’ compensation matters. The mediation may take place at the mediator’s office, at one of the attorneys’ office or at a neutral site depending upon the availability of conference rooms and where all the parties live or work.

Prior to the mediation, the employee or her attorney will submit a detailed case evaluation and settlement proposal to the insurance company. Both parties will also submit confidential background information to the mediator before the mediation so the mediator understands the issues, the claim values and the relative position of each party.

Once the mediation begins, the parties will usually be in separate conference rooms and the mediator will visit back and forth between the rooms with settlement offers and counter offers. The process may take part or all of the day until the parties either come to an agreement or determine that they cannot agree on a settlement amount or terms. Most mediations will probably be completed in 2-4 hours.

If no settlement is reached the case simply continues toward a hearing on the disputed issues and all discussions, offers or counter offers remain confidential and cannot be discussed or used at any later hearings. Essentially, there is no risk in pursuing a mediation and it is often a good way to find out how each party is valuing the case, even if a settlement is not reached. If nothing else, you will find out what the insurance company is willing to pay to settle your claim at that time. The value of any claim might increase or decrease after the mediation, depending upon medical, employment or other factors.

If a settlement is reached at the mediation, the process is the same as for any other work comp settlement. A Stipulation for Settlement is prepared, signed by the parties and submitted to a work comp judge for approval.

Do I Need an Attorney for a Mediation or Settlement Conference?

Technically, any employee may represent himself in a work comp claim at a settlement conference, mediation or even at a trial. However, keep in mind that the insurance company has experienced claims adjusters and attorneys looking out for their interests. Also, the insurance company’s interests are not the same as yours, so it is not reasonable to expect that they will voluntarily pay you a fair settlement if you are not represented by an experienced attorney.

In any type of work comp case, particularly where there are discussions about settlement or disputed issues, it is a good idea to consult with an experienced attorney to make sure you understand your rights and are being treated fairly by the insurance company.

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you. If you have questions or concerns about the cost of hiring an attorney, you can check out this previous post- How much does it cost to hire a workers’ compensation lawyer in Minnesota?

At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 30 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information for workers injured in northern Minnesota or anywhere on the Iron Range.

Avoiding Problems in Your Minnesota Work Comp Case

In my experience, the majority of Minnesota work comp claims “fly under the radar”, meaning there are no lawyers involved, no major disputes, no conferences or trials with the work comp judges, no settlements, etc. Claims involving minor injuries with fast recoveries typically are opened and closed relatively quickly without any involvement in the legal system. The goal of the work comp system is to quickly and efficiently compensate an injured worker for his or her injuries, pay the medical bills and return the injured worker to work as soon as possible. When that happens, everyone wins and the system works.

Unfortunately, not all work injury claims are that simple. When a case becomes complicated or problems arise, that’s when our office typically receives a call from an injured worker with questions or concerns. Sometimes we can simply provide information or answer some basic questions about the work comp system. In other cases, we are hired to represent the injured worker in a disputed claim with the insurance company.

There are some basic things that you can do when you have been hurt at work to avoid problems or disputes with the insurance company. Please keep in mind that these are generalizations and certainly don’t apply to every case. Each and every work comp claim is different, depending upon the employer, the insurer, the injured worker, the average weekly wage, the nature and extent of the injuries and a host of other potential factors . However, a few simple pointers can help make the claim proceed more smoothly in many cases.

1. Report the Injury Promptly and Accurately.

One of the most important things you can do if you suffer a work injury is to report the injury promptly to your employer or a supervisor. There are time limits for giving notice and if you wait too long your claim may be lost forever. Most employers will have a form to fill out but it is most important that you simply notify the employer of the work injury as soon as it happens. If you have an injury or health problem that was not caused by a specific incident but you believe it was caused by your work activities, you still need to give your employer notice that you believe you have a work related injury. (For more information, please see our previous post regarding repetitive injuries)

Accuracy in reporting the injury is also important. If you suffer an injury and are having symptoms in your neck, back, elbow, knee and wrist, make sure to list each and every body part on any notice of injury or injury report. If you develop symptoms in a new body part after the injury, promptly give notice to your employer that you are also claiming an injury to the new body part.

2. Promptly Seek Medical Attention for a Work Injury or a Work Related Medical Condition.

If you are like most people, you probably don’t visit the doctor any more often than is absolutely necessary. However, it is important to your claim that your injury or medical condition is documented early and accurately. If the claim is denied, you will need to prove your case and the best way to do so is to have medical records documenting that you reported the injury or condition to your doctor right away.

It’s also important that you make sure your doctor understands each and every injury or condition you are claiming and how they relate to your work injury or activities. The initial medical records are often crucial in disputed work comp claims and can make or break your case.

3. Keep Your Doctor Up-to-date on Your Symptoms and Work Activities.

If you continue to work with restrictions after the injury, make sure to let the doctor know if the job is aggravating your injury or if you are unable to perform your job duties. Your doctor can modify restrictions or the issue can be addressed with the employer and insurer early on in the process before it becomes a bigger problem.

4. Follow Your Doctor’s Advice.

If your treating doctor recommends physical therapy or other types of treatment, follow through with those recommendations. This is not only a good idea if you want to recover from the injury but it will also help keep your doctor supportive of you and your claim. At some point, a dispute may arise and you or your lawyer may need to ask the doctor for a medical report. The doctor is much more likely to be helpful if you have been compliant with his or her treatment recommendations.

5. Don’t Quit Your Job or Refuse a Job Offer Without Consulting a Lawyer.

If you become frustrated or angry with the employer or the work comp insurance company, you may decide to simply quit the job and walk away. This can have a significant impact on your entitlement to work comp benefits now and in the future. Before you do anything rash, contact an attorney to get some information about your rights as an injured worker. If you quit the job and then contact an attorney, it may be too late for the attorney to help you.

6. Be Aware of Surveillance.

In many cases, if the insurance company suspects that you are exaggerating your symptoms or being less than honest about your claim, they may hire an investigator to perform surveillance. This typically involves someone following you around and taking pictures or video of you performing daily activities at home or in your community. Video evidence which shows you performing activities outside of your doctor’s restrictions can be very damaging and may jeopardize your entire claim. If you have work restrictions, to be safe you should always assume that someone is watching you away from work and you should keep those restrictions in mind at all times.

Conclusion

These are just a few suggestions to keep in mind if you have been injured at work. Keep in mind that the work comp insurance company has experienced claim adjusters and attorneys looking out for their interests. They are not looking out for you, they are looking out for the insurance company’s bottom line. If you have any questions or concerns about a work injury claim, it’s always a good idea to consult with an experienced work comp attorney to learn about your rights. At Bradt Law Offices, we provide a free consultation on all Minnesota work comp claims. We have been helping your friends and neighbors with work comp claims throughout all of northern Minnesota for more than 30 years. Please don’t hesitate to call or contact us at any time with questions or if you need help.

Thank you for visiting our blog.