How Long Does a Minnesota Work Comp Claim Stay Open?

A few times each year I get calls from people with questions about an old Minnesota work comp claim. Most often, they have either had some type of flareup or progressively worsening symptoms from a work injury which had occurred several years in the past. The questions usually relate to whether the insurance company is still responsible to pay medical bills or other benefits.

There is no simple answer to this type of question but there are some general guidelines which might be helpful. The facts of each case are always different and whether your claim is still “open” will depend on some of these factors:

Was the Original Injury Reported to the Employer and Accepted by the Work Comp Insurer?  This is the starting point for determining whether the claim is still open or whether any ongoing benefits are available. When a work injury claim is reported to your employer’s work comp insurer, the insurer will decide whether to accept or deny the claim. Soon after reporting the injury you should receive a form from the insurance company entitled Notice of Insurer’s Primary Liability Determination. The form will tell you if the claim is accepted or denied and should also provide the basis for any denial.

If the claim is accepted, you may be eligible for various types of benefits under the work comp system, including wage loss, medical benefits and vocational rehabilitation services. The insurer can still fight with you or deny various types of benefits for any number of reasons, but if the claim is accepted a major battle is eliminated right at the beginning of your claim.

If the claim is denied by the insurer, you must formally file a Claim Petition with the Department of Labor and Industry-Workers’ Compensation Division before the statute of limitation (deadline) expires, or the claim is barred forever. If you have had a claim denied by a work comp insurer my recommendation would be to contact an experienced work comp attorney immediately to see what statute of limitation or deadline might apply to your case. If you wait too long, you will lose all workers’ compensation rights related to the injury.

Assuming that your claim has been accepted by the work comp insurer, these are some of the other issues which help determine whether you have any remaining benefits available:

Did You Make a Settlement?  Many work comp claims in Minnesota ultimately result in a settlement of some type. If you reached a settlement in your case, with or without an attorney, the settlement terms will generally be set forth in a document called a “Stipulation for Settlement” which is signed by the parties and approved by a workers’ compensation judge. A settlement can resolve some, or all claims related to an injury.

Frequently, a settlement will close out all future claims in exchange for a lump sum payment, but will leave open future medical expenses related to your injury. In other cases, a settlement closes all future claims, including future medical. Under the terms of that type of settlement you would not have any remaining benefits available to you from the original work injury. (For more information, see Types of Settlements in Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Claims)

Have You Been to a Hearing Before a Work Comp Judge?  If there were disputed issues in your case you may have ended up at a work comp hearing where the issues were decided by a judge. The judge’s decision may affect what benefits are available to you in the future. If you were represented by an attorney, he or she should be able to explain what potential benefits remain available to you.

How Long Ago Was Your Injury?  There have been significant changes to Minnesota’s work comp laws over the past 30 + years, particularly in 1984, 1992 and 1995. As a general rule, the law in effect on the date of your injury will control what benefits are available to you. Over the years, there have been limits or caps imposed on wage loss, medical and vocational rehabilitation, so the date of your injury is a very important factor to consider when evaluating what benefits may be available on your claim.

Were You Ever Given a Permanent Partial Disability (PPD) rating?  A PPD rating is usually given by your surgeon or treating physician upon completion of your treatment or recovery from your injury. If you qualify for a rating under the disability schedules, the doctor provides the applicable percentage (%) rating from the schedules and you are entitled to be compensated by the insurer based upon that percentage. Not every injury results in a ratable disability but if you had surgery or have permanent restrictions or symptoms, you may qualify. This benefit is often overlooked and not paid, particularly if the injured worker did not have an attorney providing guidance. (For more information on this subject, please check out our previous post explaining Permanent Partial Disability Ratings)

Have you had a new injury or aggravation? Let’s say you had a back injury in 1998 which was accepted by the work comp insurer and you received wage loss and medical benefits following the injury. Assuming you went back to work at some point and are now having low back problems again, the original insurer is not likely to resume payment of medical or other benefits without some updated information from you, such as:

-Do your current problems involve the same part of your back that was injured in 1998?

-Have you had any new back injuries since 1998 (work injuries, car accidents, slip and falls, etc)?

-Have your work activities since 1998 aggravated or accelerated your back problems?  (if so, you might have a new work comp claim  against your current employer. For more information about a gradual, repetitive injury claim see our previous article here)

-Have you been getting regular medical care over the years for your back and do the medical records support your claim that the problems are related to the 1998 injury?

There are many other factors which may affect whether you have any claims remaining from an old work comp injury. These are just a few of the considerations that might come into play. If you have questions about an old injury claim and were represented by an attorney, you should start by contacting the attorney’s office to see if they still have your file or could provide you with documents or information. If that’s not an option or if you did not have an attorney, we would be happy to offer a free consultation to answer your questions and provide whatever guidance that we can. Some helpful information for you to gather before any consultation would be the date of injury, name of the work comp insurer and copies of any settlements or other legal decisions relating to your claim.

Thank you for visiting our blog. At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 33 years. If you found this information helpful, please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information and assistance for workers injured in northern Minnesota and anywhere on the Iron Range.

Can the Insurance Company Refuse to Pay Medical Bills after a Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Settlement?

This is a question I frequently hear not only from clients but also from people who have settled a claim, with or without a lawyer, at sometime in the past. In fact, sometimes many years have gone by since the settlement before this issue arises and I receive a phone call. The question is usually something along these lines:

“I settled my work comp case but medical was left open, now the insurance company won’t pay for a doctor visit (or an MRI, surgery, etc. ) – how can they do this?”

This can be a very confusing issue after the settlement of a work comp claim, whether or not you were represented by an attorney. It would seem, from a common sense standpoint, that if future medical coverage was supposedly “left open” for your work injury, then the insurance company should have to pay any future medical bills. However, it’s not quite that simple, for several reasons:

1. The work comp insurance company always has the right to challenge whether medical treatment is reasonable, necessary and related to the work injury.  Regardless of whether an injury claim is accepted, decided in your favor by a judge or settled, the insurance company is not obligated to pay every medical bill without question. The burden of proof remains on the injured employee in a Minnesota work comp case, which means that you have to prove that any disputed medical treatment is reasonable, necessary, and related to the work injury.

This typically requires some medical support for your claim, either in the form of medical records which clearly explain the situation or in the form of a medical report from a treating physician which addresses the disputed issues and supports your position. For this reason, it is very important to have a doctor who not only understands the work comp system but is also willing to support you, if necessary, with a letter or medical report. (For more information about selecting a doctor in a work comp case, see our previous blog post here).

2. Months or even years have passed without treatment for your injuries. If you haven’t treated for your work injury in a long time, the insurance company will not have any up-to-date information regarding your claim and they will want to make sure that the medical care is still related to the work injury. Sometimes, all the insurance company needs is updated medical records which will demonstrate that your physicians are still relating your treatment to the original work injury. If the medical records do not clearly make that connection, it may be necessary to get a letter or report from your doctor. In any event, the insurance company is entitled to get updated information before deciding whether to pay a medical bill or authorize treatment.

3. You have been back to work for a different employer since the settlement. The insurance company will likely want to make sure that you haven’t had a new injury or that your new job has not aggravated the injury that was covered by your previous settlement. Again, particularly in a case where you haven’t made any medical claims for some period of time, the insurance company will need updated information before making a decision on any medical bills. In fact, if you have returned to work in a different job and your symptoms have increased or worsened, you may very well have a new work comp claim against your new employer for a permanent or substantial aggravation of your underlying medical condition.

4. Your current problems were not specifically addressed in the settlement agreement.  Let’s assume that the original injury and settlement involved your left shoulder and you are now having problems with your left elbow. Your doctor suspects that the elbow problems may be coming from the shoulder or are somehow related to the shoulder injury. The language in the settlement papers describing what injuries were covered will be very important. In this type of case, it may come down to arguing about whether the elbow problems are related to the shoulder or whether they represent a new, unrelated problem. These types of issues arise frequently and are normally going to be the subject of litigation.

5. The medical treatment being denied was closed out under the terms of the settlement.  The settlement papers you signed (a Stipulation for Settlement) described the injuries and claims you were making, the claims or defenses of the insurance company and the terms of the settlement. In many cases, even where future medical remains open, there is an agreement to close out certain, limited future medical treatment such as acupuncture/acupressure, massage therapy, health club memberships, psychiatric/psychological treatment, etc. This means that the insurance company is no longer responsible for any of those types of treatment even if they are related to your original injury.

Also, medical treatment for specific body parts may have been closed out by the terms of the settlement if there were disputes over the nature and extent of your original injuries. For example, you may have originally claimed an injury to your neck and low back but the terms of the settlement may have only left open future medical treatment for your neck, closing out any low back medical claims.

What you can do to help avoid disputes over  future medical coverage after a settlement:

-Understand exactly what body parts and what type of medical coverage remains open and what was closed out by the terms of the settlement;

-Keep a copy of your settlement papers for reference;

-Make sure any and all medical treatment for your injuries after a settlement is billed to the work comp insurer, not to your health insurance. This helps ensure that the work comp insurance company remains aware of your ongoing medical issues if something serious for expensive arises such as surgery or the need for an MRI;

-Make sure to always tell your physician that the condition you are treating for is related to a work injury and give as many details as you can, such as the date of the injury and what body parts were injured, so there is a paper trail of any ongoing medical care or treatment from your work injury.

These are just some of the potential medical scenarios which might arise after a settlement and some of the things you can do to lessen the likelihood of more litigation on your claim. It probably goes without saying that you should not settle a work comp claim without first speaking with an experienced work comp attorney.

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us, anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you.

Remember, you are dealing with an insurance company which handles hundreds or thousands of claims every day. They have experienced claims adjusters and attorneys managing their files. Even if you don’t need a lawyer at the moment, a little information about the work comp system can make a big difference for you in your dealings with the insurance company. At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 33 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information and assistance for workers injured in northern Minnesota and anywhere on the Iron Range

What Is the Difference Between a Settlement Conference and Mediation in a Minnesota Work Comp Case?

Over the past several years we have seen the increasing use of mediation to settle work comp cases in Minnesota. If you have a work comp claim, you may wonder why a settlement conference was scheduled on your case but a mediation has then been proposed or scheduled. What’s the difference, and is one better than the other?

Settlement Conferences

Settlement conferences are automatically scheduled by the workers’ compensation Office of Administrative Hearings after a claim is filed.

In every work comp case where a Claim Petition is filed, a settlement conference is automatically scheduled for approximately 6 months later. Depending upon where you live, these conferences may be scheduled by telephone or may take place in person with a work comp settlement judge in St. Paul. A settlement conferences is an informal opportunity for the parties to attempt to settle any disputed issues and sometimes the entire claim.

Settlement conferences are scheduled to last one hour and a work comp judge presides over the conference to help the parties reach a settlement. It is not a trial and the judge does not have any authority to order the parties to agree to any particular terms, nor does the judge have authority to make any decisions about the disputed issues. If the claim does not settle, it will be put on the trial calendar for a hearing a few months later with a different judge.

Frequently, settlement conferences are either postponed or canceled altogether. A conference may be postponed because it is too early in the case to discuss settlement, possibly because of pending surgeries or ongoing medical care which needs to be completed. In other cases, the parties may agree that there is no possibility of settlement and ask that the case be put on the trial calendar for hearing. This may occur in cases where the insurance company has denied liability for the claim or where there is a dispute over a proposed surgery or medical procedure. In these types of cases, there may be no room for compromise and the disputed issues need to be decided by a judge.

If a case is settled at a conference, the defense attorney will prepare a Stipulation for Settlement, which sets forth the terms of the agreement. All necessary parties must sign the Stipulation and it is then submitted to a compensation judge for approval before the insurance company makes payment.

Mediation

A mediation is also a method to get the case settled but it is more formal and involved than a simple one hour settlement conference. Typically, the parties agree to mediate cases that are more complicated or have more value. The parties will choose a mutually agreeable mediator who is experienced in Minnesota workers’ compensation matters. The mediation may take place at the mediator’s office, at one of the attorneys’ office or at a neutral site depending upon the availability of conference rooms and where all the parties live or work.

Prior to the mediation, the employee or her attorney will submit a detailed case evaluation and settlement proposal to the insurance company. Both parties will also submit confidential background information to the mediator before the mediation so the mediator understands the issues, the claim values and the relative position of each party.

Once the mediation begins, the parties will usually be in separate conference rooms and the mediator will visit back and forth between the rooms with settlement offers and counter offers. The process may take part or all of the day until the parties either come to an agreement or determine that they cannot agree on a settlement amount or terms. Most mediations will probably be completed in 2-4 hours.

If no settlement is reached the case simply continues toward a hearing on the disputed issues and all discussions, offers or counter offers remain confidential and cannot be discussed or used at any later hearings. Essentially, there is no risk in pursuing a mediation and it is often a good way to find out how each party is valuing the case, even if a settlement is not reached. If nothing else, you will find out what the insurance company is willing to pay to settle your claim at that time. The value of any claim might increase or decrease after the mediation, depending upon medical, employment or other factors.

If a settlement is reached at the mediation, the process is the same as for any other work comp settlement. A Stipulation for Settlement is prepared, signed by the parties and submitted to a work comp judge for approval.

Do I Need an Attorney for a Mediation or Settlement Conference?

Technically, any employee may represent himself in a work comp claim at a settlement conference, mediation or even at a trial. However, keep in mind that the insurance company has experienced claims adjusters and attorneys looking out for their interests. Also, the insurance company’s interests are not the same as yours, so it is not reasonable to expect that they will voluntarily pay you a fair settlement if you are not represented by an experienced attorney.

In any type of work comp case, particularly where there are discussions about settlement or disputed issues, it is a good idea to consult with an experienced attorney to make sure you understand your rights and are being treated fairly by the insurance company.

If you have been injured on the job and have questions about the Minnesota work comp system, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. You can contact us anytime, with questions about your case or to arrange an absolutely free consultation. It won’t cost you anything and we will always give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you. If you have questions or concerns about the cost of hiring an attorney, you can check out this previous post- How much does it cost to hire a workers’ compensation lawyer in Minnesota?

At Bradt Law Offices, we have been providing assistance to injured workers all across northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for more than 30 years.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please spread the word that we are a good source of work comp information for workers injured in northern Minnesota or anywhere on the Iron Range.

Types of Settlements in Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Claims

Each day I take a few minutes to review the statistics for this blog to find out how many people are visiting and what type of search terms they are using to find us.  The overwhelming number of searches that bring people here involve questions regarding settlements.  I have previously written posts entitled:

When Do You Get a Work Comp Settlement in Minnesota, and

How Much Can I Receive for Minnesota Work Comp Settlement

Based upon what I have seen readers searching for, this seemed like a good time to write another post discussing the types of settlements you might receive in a Minnesota work comp claim.  I won’t go into details from the other posts regarding the timing of a settlement and how claims are valued for settlement purposes.  In this post, I will discuss the most common types of settlements that I have seen in my practice, handling work comp claims in northern Minnesota over the past 29 years.

To- Date  Settlement

A “to-date” settlement is just what it suggests.  It represents a settlement of disputed claims only through the date of the settlement agreement.  The dispute might involve medical issues, wage loss benefits, vocational rehabilitation issues or any combination of work comp benefits.  The claims might be disputed because the insurance company has denied primary liability or the dispute might revolve around differing opinions between treating physicians or the insurance company doctor. There are always plenty of things for an insurance company to fight about.

Regardless of the dispute, the parties agree to settle the claim only through the date that the agreement is reached.  The settlement may involve payment of some amount of disputed wage loss benefits or it might simply be an agreement to provide medical care or approve surgery.  A Stipulation for Settlement will be prepared, signed by the parties and submitted to a compensation judge for approval.  Once approved, the disputed issues are settled but no future claims are compromised, limited or surrendered.

In my experience, these types of settlements don’t occur all that often, primarily because the insurance company usually wants to close all claims completely when they make a settlement.  However, under certain circumstances a to-date settlement might be in everyone’s best interest.

Full, Final and Complete  Settlement with Future Medical Claims Left Open

This is probably the most common type of settlement.  Again, the dispute between you and the insurance company might involve one or many issues.  Perhaps the insurance company is attempting to discontinue your wage loss benefits, has denied your claim for vocational retraining or simply wants to pay you a lump sum to close your file and be done with you.  In its most common form, this type of settlement means that, for an agreed-upon lump sum payment, you have closed out, or given up, all future claims for any type of work comp benefits relating to your injury, except medical coverage or treatment.  If you can agree with the insurance company on a dollar amount and the appropriate terms, a Stipulation for Settlement is prepared, signed and submitted to a judge for approval.  The judge can refuse to approve the settlement for a number of reasons, although such refusal is extremely rare, particularly where both parties are represented by experienced attorneys.

It is also important to note that when we say you are closing out all claims, we are only speaking about claims related to the specific work injury you are presently claiming.  You cannot close out future claims related to injuries you haven’t had yet or don’t know about.

Full, Final and Complete  Settlement with Some Future Medical Claims Left Open, Some Closed

In this type of settlement, you would settle your claim on a lump sum basis and only limited future medical coverage would remain open with respect to the claimed injury.  Under the terms of this type of settlement, the parties will negotiate a closeout of certain, specific, future medical coverages.  A common example would be the insurance company’s request for a closeout of future acupuncture or acupressure expenses, health club memberships, massage therapy or other types of passive treatment.  The insurance company does not want to end up paying for this type of treatment after a settlement or, worse, fighting over this treatment with you and your lawyer and having to pay for the treatment and your lawyer’s attorney fees.

You would still be covered by the work comp insurance company for all other future medical treatment, such as doctor appointments, physical therapy, surgery, injections, MRIs, etc.  Basically, anything that is not specifically closed out remains available to you, subject to the work comp laws.  The insurance company can still challenge future medical bills and make you prove that the treatment is reasonable, necessary and related to your work injury.  Leaving future medical coverage “open” doesn’t  necessarily mean the insurance company has to pay every medical bill you ever submit for the rest of your life without challenge.

Some other common future medical benefits which are sometimes closed out are chiropractic expenses, pain clinic programs, psychological or psychiatric coverage.  All of these types of treatment or therapy are ordinarily covered under the work comp law and would be theoretically available to you after a settlement if you don’t specifically agree to close them out.  The insurance company cannot force you to close these future claims out, but often makes this a term of the settlement they are proposing.  In other words, they won’t pay the settlement money unless you agree to these terms.  Whether or not to close out any future medical benefits as part of a settlement is a decision you and your lawyer will have to make based upon all of the facts and circumstances of your particular claim and medical condition.

Full, Final and Complete  Settlement with All Future Medical Claims Closed

This is a rare type of settlement and most often occurs where the insurance company has denied the entire claim right from the beginning.  In other words, the insurance company has denied “primary liability”, and has raised one of many possible defenses to the claim.  They may be claiming that the injury is not covered by work comp, didn’t  happen on the job, is a pre-existing condition or was caused by your intoxication or horseplay.  For whatever reason, the insurer will not accept the claim or pay any benefits voluntarily.  Depending upon the medical or other evidence, the insurance company may still be willing to pay a settlement in order to avoid the risk of trial.  You may be willing to do the same.

Under those circumstances, an agreement might be reached for a lump sum payment which closes out all work comp claims relating to the injury, including future medical.  Like any other settlement, it must be approved by a compensation judge.  However, where there is a denial of primary liability and a possibility that you could end up with nothing if the case went to a trial, a compensation judge is generally going to approve such a settlement.

Structured  Settlements

While not very common, sometimes an insurance company will offer a structured settlement instead of a single lump sum. This more often occurs where the injured worker is a younger person and has a potentially large claim into the future.  The terms  would be the same as one of the settlements listed above, but instead of a single lump sum, the payment might be in the form of a structured settlement or an annuity, paid out over time in regular installments.

Summary

Every case is different and these are just the most common types of work comp settlements that I have negotiated over the years.  There are other, less common types of settlements, which might be negotiated depending on the circumstances of a particular case.  If you have a work injury claim and the insurance company wants to make a settlement, please take the time to contact an experienced attorney before you make a settlement. The insurance company hires attorneys and claims adjusters to protect their interests.  Why wouldn’t you do the same?

If you have any questions about a work comp claim, a settlement offer or any other issues relating to work comp,  please feel to contact me at any time with your questions.  I would be happy to arrange to meet with you for an absolutely free consultation at your convenience. You will always get my honest assessment of your claim and my advice as to whether you need a lawyer.

Thank you for visiting our blog.  At Bradt Law Offices, we have been representing injured workers all across beautiful northern Minnesota and the Iron Range for nearly 30 years.  If you have found this information helpful, please share this site with your friends or neighbors  who might have workers’ compensation questions or problems.

How Much Can I Receive for a Minnesota Work Comp Settlement?

Although there is no single or simple answer to this question, I have posted it because this is one of the most common search requests I see from people visiting our blog.  Every day, I see search requests which involve some form of the question:  how much is a work comp settlement in Minnesota?

It is perfectly understandable to wonder if you will receive a settlement for your claim and how much it might be.  After all, we all know someone who has settled a work comp claim, or we have heard rumors about how much someone received for an injury claim.  Now that you have been injured and are “in the system”, you probably have the same questions and concerns.

In a previous blog post, I discussed when, or if, you might get a settlement in a Minnesota work comp case.  I explained that a “settlement” is not a guaranteed part of every claim.  (See this previous post, When Do You Get a Work Comp Settlement in Minnesota?)  In today’s  post, I will discuss how a claim is valued for settlement purposes.

As I pointed out in my earlier post, not every case results in a settlement.   In addition, every settlement is different, based upon a variety of factors which will be different in every case.  The only way to put a value on your individual case, is to look at all of the factors which affect how much the insurance company might be willing to pay to settle your claim.  Some of the factors considered are:

Average Weekly Wage and Compensation Rate.  Every claim starts with the basic determination of your average weekly wage on the date of injury. Any wage loss benefits you are paid after that are based upon the average weekly wage.  The higher your average weekly wage, the more value your claim will probably have.  It stands to reason that if the insurance company is paying you wage loss benefits at the maximum rate of $850 per week, your claim has more value than someone who was working part-time at minimum wage and is receiving work comp benefits of $175 per week.

How Many Weeks Have You Been Paid and How Many Do You Have Remaining?  There are limits on the number of weeks that you can receive certain benefits.  Temporary Total Disability (TTD) benefits are limited to 130 weeks (104 weeks for injuries occurring before 10/1/08). Temporary Partial Disability (TPD) benefits are limited to 225 weeks and are not available if more than 450 weeks have elapsed since your date of injury.

Keep in mind that these are not guaranteed weeks of wage loss benefits.  Your benefits might end long before 130 or 225 weeks, for a variety of reasons – these are simply the maximum number of weeks you can receive.  So, if the insurance company has already paid you most of the available weeks of benefits you can receive, they don’t have much exposure in terms of future benefits.  Or, if your weekly wage loss benefits are about to end for some other reason, your claim may have limited value for settlement purposes.

On the other hand, if you have only been paid a few weeks and it appears that you will be eligible for long-term, ongoing wage loss benefits, then your claim would have significantly more value.

How Serious Was Your Injury and What Are Your Restrictions?  If you are permanently unable to return to a high-paying job, your claim has more value.  The insurance company will likely be paying you weekly wage loss benefits for many months.  Or, they may realize that you need vocational retraining, which can also be very expensive.  Your claim would have more value under those circumstances.

On the other hand, if your injury is only temporary and you can return to your previous job at your regular wage, the insurance company may not consider the claim as having long-term financial exposure.  They may simply wait for you to return to work at full wage and just pay future medical expenses related to your injury, without wanting to make any type of settlement.

How Strong or Weak Is Your Claim?  Has your entire claim been denied by the work comp insurance company?  If so, they may be willing to take their chances at a hearing.  If the insurance company wins, they don’t have to pay you anything.

In a medical dispute, the strength or weakness of the medical evidence is a key factor.  If you have a strong, supportive medical report from your doctor, your claim will have more value than if you have weak medical evidence.

What Issues Are Being Disputed?  If the only dispute is over a small medical bill or a few weeks of wage loss benefits, the claim probably won’t have much value.  If the dispute involves Permanent Total Disability (PTD) or retraining, the insurance company is looking at a lot more exposure for future benefits and the claim will have more value, assuming you have a strong claim based upon solid medical and vocational evidence.

How Old Are You, How Disabled Are You and What Are Your Plans for the Future?   If you are a younger person with a serious injury, a high wage  and plans to work for many more years, you might have a claim that could cost the insurance company a lot of money.  Those types of claims, if supported by strong medical evidence, can result in significant settlements.  On the other hand, if you are near retirement age, are only temporarily disabled or have a minor injury, your claim will be valued much differently.

These are only some of the factors that are considered when trying to put a value on a claim if the insurance company wants to make a settlement. There can be other factors that come into play, including previous injuries or pre-existing conditions, credibility issues, your cooperation with vocational rehabilitation, the quality of any job search you might have done and many others.

What We Recommend

If the insurance company proposes a settlement of your work comp claim, you should immediately contact an experienced attorney for advice or representation.  A claims adjuster or defense attorney will have far more experience than you in evaluating the claim.  Obviously, they will try to settle your claim as cheaply as possible.  Even though a settlement must be approved by a work comp judge, the judge does not represent you and cannot give you any advice about whether it is a fair settlement.

If you have any questions about your work injury claim, whether it involves a settlement or anything else, feel free to contact me at Bradt Law Offices anytime, with any questions.  We can talk about your claim on the phone or we can make an appointment to meet – either way it is an absolutely free consultation.  We can meet in my Grand Rapids office or wherever it would be convenient for you.

I  have been representing your friends and neighbors in their work comp claims all across northeastern Minnesota for nearly 30 years.  If you’ve been injured, we can help.

Thank you for visiting our blog.

When Should I Hire a Lawyer for My Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Claim?

A very common question.  In fact, a question that I am asked nearly every time I meet with someone about a work comp claim for the first time.  A very good question but one with no easy answer.  An easier question to answer would be  “when is it a good idea to talk to a lawyer about my work comp claim?”   Talking to a lawyer is not necessarily the same as hiring a lawyer.

We regularly speak with people who simply have questions about a claim or a potential claim.  They are just looking for information about the work comp system and where their claim might be heading.  Unless you’ve been through the system before, a work comp claim can be stressful and confusing.  At Bradt Law Offices, there is never a charge for a phone call or an office consultation to answer those types of questions.  Whether you have a claim that the insurance company is already paying or whether you are considering filing a claim, there are many situations where it’s a good idea to check with an attorney.  These are just a few:

You aren’t sure whether to file an injury report:   You’ve been hurt or have a medical condition that you feel is related to your work or job duties, but you just aren’t sure.  Give us a call.

Your claim has been denied:   The insurance company has denied your claim, for whatever reason. This is one situation where you definitely need to speak with a lawyer, and the sooner the better, because claims have deadlines. Don’t give up your claim without talking to an attorney.

You think the insurance company has calculated your wages wrong:   All wage loss benefits paid to you are based upon your “average weekly wage” on the date of injury.  Calculating the average weekly wage can be complicated and may include overtime and other compensation.   If the insurance company gets this wrong, they may be paying you less than they should.

Your benefits have been discontinued:   Your wage loss benefits have been discontinued but you disagree with the reasons given for the discontinuance.  Definitely give us a call – you only have a short time to object to the discontinuance and request a hearing.

There is a dispute over your work restrictions:   The insurance company may send you to one of their own doctors for an “Independent” Medical Examination (referred to as an IME).  Almost always, that doctor will disagree with your treating doctor about everything from diagnosis to treatment and restrictions.  The insurance company will then frequently use the IME doctor’s report to cut off your wage loss and/or medical benefits.

The insurance company won’t pay a medical bill:  This can occur for many reasons, but often occurs shortly after you receive the IME report.

The insurance company won’t approve a medical procedure:  The insurance company will not agree to authorize surgery, injections, physical therapy, an MRI,  a second opinion, a change of treating doctor, a referral to a specialist, etc.

A QRC is assigned to your case:   A QRC is a Qualified Rehabilitation Consultant, who will provide vocational rehabilitation services to you if you are off work because of your injury.  (For more information about QRC’s,  see this article.)  The choice of QRC is yours,  not the insurance company’s.  Unfortunately, they don’t usually explain this to you and most injured workers have no idea where to find a QRC they can trust.  We have a number of QRC’s that we work with regularly and can strongly recommend.

The insurance company offers you a settlement:  If the insurance company wants to settle your case, make sure to at least consult with an attorney before you do so. An insurance company claims adjuster is far more knowledgeable about workers’ compensation than you are. Any settlement must be approved by a workers’ compensation judge.  (For more information about settlements, read this earlier post)

Or, maybe you just have a few questions…

A workers’ compensation claim can be a confusing, frightening and frustrating ordeal.  Please don’t be afraid to contact us,  anytime,  if we can answer some questions for you.  It won’t cost you anything and we will give you our honest assessment about whether you need a lawyer to represent you.  Remember, you are dealing with an insurance company which handles hundreds or thousands of claims every day.  They have experienced claims adjusters and attorneys managing their files.  Even if you don’t need a lawyer at the moment, a little information about how the work comp system works can make a big difference for you in your dealings with the insurance company.

If you decide to hire us,  whether now or at some later time, there are no costs or expenses to you.   We don’t ask for any money upfront and we only get paid if we win.  For more information about hiring us and how we get paid,  please see this earlier post.

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and please tell your friends that we are a source of good work comp information for workers injured in northern Minnesota and anywhere on the Iron Range.

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